Monument Valley KOA Journey Campground Open For 2018 Summer Season

KOA News Service (MARCH 27, 2018) – The Monument Valley KOA Journey campground, located at MM2, US Highway 163 in Monument Valley, is now open for the 2018 summer camping season.

“Campground owners at KOAs throughout the U.S. and Canada have been working hard to get ready for the season ahead,” said KOA President Toby O’Rourke. “They’re ready to provide outstanding experiences to their guests, and we are all looking forward to a fantastic season ahead.”

For the third year in a row, KOA has partnered with Keystone RV Company to get the camping season started off right. The grand prize winner of the 2018 “What’s Behind the Yellow Sign?” Giveaway will receive a Keystone Passport ROV Travel Trailer valued at $19,800, as well as a $500 KOA gift card and $1000 in cash.

The Giveaway will run through May 31, 2018. Campers can enter daily by visiting www.BehindTheSignGiveaway.com or on the Kampgrounds of America, Inc. Facebook page.

KOA has just released its 2018 Edition of the KOA Directory, a complete travel atlas of every U.S. state and Canadian province. It includes a descriptive listing of each KOA campground, including the Monument Valley KOA Journey, as well as detailed maps and directions to each location. It is free at any KOA campground and available online at http://koa.uberflip.com/i/784851-2018-koa-directory.

Kampgrounds of America is celebrating its 56th Anniversary in 2018. KOA, the world’s largest network of family-friendly campgrounds with more than 500 locations in North America, was born on the banks of the Yellowstone River in Billings, Montana in 1962.

Drivers should plan for extra time on US 163 north of Kayenta due to construction project that begins today

The Arizona Department of Transportation advises drivers to plan for extra time when traveling on US 163 north of Kayenta during a scheduled six-month-long construction project that begins today (March 14).

The 1-mile work zone, located between mileposts 400 and 401, is approximately 5 miles north
of Kayenta. Drivers traveling between Kayenta and the Utah state line will use a temporary detour alongside US 163 to continue north- and southbound travel through the work zone. US 163 is the highway motorists use to access the popular Monument Valley Navajo Tribal park near the Arizona-Utah border.

Drivers should expect intermittent delays of up to 30 minutes during the construction project, which is  needed to improve the drainage system along this portion of US 163 during rain storms.

Motorists should slow down and use caution through the work zone. To learn more about the US 163 roadway improvement project, visit [www.azdot.gov/US163]www.azdot.gov/US163.

Schedules are subject to change based on weather and other unforeseen factors. For more information, please call the ADOT Project Information Line at 855.712.8530 or email Projects@azdot.gov. For real-time highway conditions statewide, visit ADOT’s Traveler Information Site at www.az511.gov, follow ADOT on Twitter (@ArizonaDOT) or call 511, except when driving.

Secretary Zinke Directs Interior Bureaus to Take Aggressive Action to Prevent Wildfires

WASHINGTON– Today, U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke directed all Department of the Interior bureaus, superintendents, and land managers at all levels to adopt more aggressive practices, using the full authority of the Department, to prevent and combat the spread of catastrophic wildfires through robust fuels reduction and pre-suppression techniques. 

This year-to-date, 47,700 wildfires have burned 8 million acres across the country, with the majority of the devastation in the states of California and Montana. High-profile fires in Yosemite and Glacier National Parks have caught national headlines, however millions of acres of forest and grassland have burned in recent months.

“This Administration will take a serious turn from the past and will proactively work to prevent forest fires through aggressive and scientific fuels reduction management to save lives, homes, and wildlife habitat. It is well settled that the steady accumulation and thickening of vegetation in areas that have historically burned at frequent intervals exacerbates fuel conditions and often leads to larger and higher-intensity fires,” said Secretary Zinke. “These fires are more damaging, more costly, and threaten the safety and security of both the public and firefighters. In recent fire reviews, I have heard this described as ‘a new normal.’ It is unacceptable that we should be satisfied with the status quo. We must be innovative and where new authorities are needed, we will work with our colleagues in Congress to craft management solutions that will benefit our public lands for generations to come.”

The Secretary is directing managers and superintendents of units that have burnable vegetation to address the threat of fire in all of their activities, and to use the full range of existing authorities, to reduce fuels.

Bryan Rice, Director of the Office of Wildland Fire, said, “It is critical to fully consider the benefits of fuels reduction in the everyday management activities that we carry out for our public land management objectives, such as clearing along roadsides, around visitor use areas like campgrounds and trails, near employee housing areas, and within administrative site areas subject to wildfire.”

The Department has lost historic structures in wildfires like Glacier National Park’s historic Sperry Chalet lodge. In an effort to help prevent future losses, the Secretary is also directing increased protection of Interior assets that are in wildfire prone areas, following the Firewise guidance, writing: “If we ask local communities to ‘be safer from the start’ and meet Firewise standards, we should be the leaders of and the model for ‘Firewise-friendly’ standards in our planning, development, and maintenance of visitor-service and administrative facilities.”

“I welcome Secretary Zinke’s new directive and his attention to the catastrophic fires taking place in many western states,” said Senator Lisa Murkowski, Chairman of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee. “Treating our landscapes mitigates wildfire risk, increases firefighter safety, and makes our forests and rangelands healthy and resilient. We can no longer delay the implementation of this important work.” 

House Natural Resources Chairman Rob Bishop said, “We must ensure our land management agencies have the tools and resources they need to protect communities and landscapes from catastrophic wildfire. Over the long term, Congress and the Administration must work together to reverse the sorry state of our federal forests and grasslands. I’m heartened to finally have an Administration that’s focused on actively managing and addressing the on-the-ground conditions that are contributing to our historic wildfire crisis. I hope to build on this by enacting comprehensive legislation to restore the health and resiliency of federal lands.”

“If we don’t start managing our forests, the forests are going to start managing us,” said Montana Senator Steve Daines.”The fires burning across Montana are a catastrophe, and we need all available resources to combat this threat. I applaud Secretary Zinke’s action to focus resources on attacking wildfires.”

“I applaud Secretary Zinke’s effort to thin the threat. If we can reduce the fuel loads in our forests and rangelands we will provide our fire fighters more defensible space to do their jobs,” said Idaho Senator James Risch. “We need bold actions like this not just for the hurricanes in the south and east but also to avert the devastation caused by the wildfires in the west.”

“More than 50 million acres in the United States are currently at risk for catastrophic wildfire. That is why we must act to prevent calamitous fires. Management actions taken by Secretary Zinke today will not completely stop the risk, but it is an important step forward in our fight to turn unhealthy, overgrown, and infested forests into thriving, healthy ecosystems,” said Congressman Bruce Westerman. “I commend Secretary Zinke for recognizing this emergency situation and taking steps to address prevent further loss of life and property due to these preventable, catastrophic wildfires. I am committed to working with him and my colleagues in Congress to find a permanent solution to this problem that emphasizes active forest management as the first line of defense against catastrophic wildfires.”

With Western Fire season reaching its natural peak in September, the National Multi-Agency Coordinating Group (NMAC) elevated the National Fire Preparedness Level to “5”, the highest level NMAC declares, on August 10, 2017. Above normal major-fire activity continues to be observed across portions of the Pacific Northwest, Northern Rockies, northern Great Basin, and northern California. Fuel moisture levels and fire danger indices in these areas are at near-record to record levels for severity. Drier and warmer than average conditions across the central Great Basin and Southern California are allowing for the fine fuels to become more receptive to fire activity.

Request for Qualifications – Kayenta Bus Route

Request for Qualifications # KY-17-007-01 – Kayenta Bus Route

Kayenta Bus Route Final Plans

Please amend and include the following information for Request for Qualifications #KY-100-1-11-5610 as follows:

1. Due Date and time revised to: 4:30 pm, August 15, 2017 p.m. MST

2. Last Day for Questions: 4:30 pm, August 10, 2017 p.m. MST

3. Contractor to use plans dated 8/7/17 & Construction Manual 8/2/17 completed by

Arrowhead Engineering, Inc. available by contacting:

a. Ernnon Quanah, eq@arrowheadengineeringinc.com Office: 520-448-5212

b. https://www.facebook.com/kayenta.township.5/

c. http://kayentatownship?nsn.gov/Home/

4. Attendance at Pre Bid Meeting held 8/2/17 is NON-MANDATORY. Bids can be submitted from all interested parties.

 

Statement from Secretary Zinke on Navajo Nation Council vote to extend lease of Navajo Generating Station

WASHINGTON – Statement from U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke after the Navajo Nation Council has ratified a new lease with the Salt River Project to provide for continued operations of the Navajo Generating Station through 2019:

“Since the first weeks of the Trump Administration, one of Interior’s top priorities has been to roll up our sleeves with diverse stakeholders in search of an economic path forward to extend NGS and Kayenta Mine operations after 2019.  Operating NGS and the Kayenta Mine through 2019 is the first step to meet this priority.

“This Navajo Nation Council’s endorsement of a new lease gives NGS and Kayenta Mine workers a fighting chance and gives Navajo and Hopi economies a moment to regroup for the work ahead. Now, NGS operations can continue while stakeholders examine opportunities for a new operating partner to extend the life of the plant beyond its original 50-year lease.

“I salute Council Speaker Lorenzo Bates and Navajo Nation President Russell Begaye for their leadership and their partnership. Interior is a proud defender of the Nation’s sovereignty – as well as the sovereignty of the Hopi Tribe – as we work together to chart the future of this important facility.”

BACKGROUND:

The Navajo Generating Station is a three-unit, 2,250-megawatt, coal-fired power plant located on tribal trust lands leased from the Navajo Nation near Page, Arizona. Coal for NGS comes from the Kayenta Mine located on tribal trust lands leased from the Navajo Nation and Hopi Tribe.

Current NGS co-owners have expressed their intention to not operate the facility after December 2019; as a result, stakeholders associated with NGS have been jointly discussing the facility’s future in talks facilitated by Interior.

Without the new lease ratified by the Navajo Nation this week, preparations to start the decommissioning of the plant would be required as early as next month. The new lease allows the operating owner of the facility – the Salt River Project – to defer any decommissioning activities until after the original 50-year lease period concludes, in December of 2019. This allows NGS and Kayenta Mine operations to continue in the near-term without interruption, and allows more time to find new ownership for NGS.

Plan for restrictions on US 191 near Many Farms

Fuel spill cleanup expected to last three weeks

US 191 on the Navajo Nation in northeastern Arizona is narrowed to one lane only near Many Farms for the next three weeks so crews can clean up diesel fuel that spilled during a serious crash on May 14. The lane restriction is in place around-the-clock until cleanup work is complete.

Drivers should plan for a reduced speed limit and be prepared to stop as they approach the work zone at milepost 458.9. Flaggers will direct alternating traffic through the open travel lane. Expect delays of up to 15 minutes. The lane restriction on US 191 is scheduled be lifted by the second week of June barring weather or other unforeseen conditions.

If you have questions or comments, please call the ADOT Project Information Line at 855.712.8530 or email [projects@azdot.gov]Projects@azdot.gov.

ADOT works to inform the public about planned highway restrictions and closures, but it’s possible that unscheduled impacts might occur because of weather or other factors. For the most current information about highway conditions statewide, visit ADOT’s Traveler Information site at az511.gov, follow ADOT on Twitter (@ArizonaDOT) or call 511, except while driving.

Add time for travel to Page on US 89 Wednesday and Thursday

Motorists traveling on US 89 to Page should allow extra time while surface sealant is applied on a nine-mile segment of the roadway just south of Horseshoe Bend Overlook. Work will occur between mileposts 537 and 546 during daylight hours Wednesday, May 17, and Thursday, May 18.

The roadway will be reduced to one lane with a pilot car guiding alternating traffic through the work zone. Drivers should observe reduced speed limits and watch for construction personnel and equipment in the work zone.

ADOT works to inform the public about planned highway restrictions and closures, but it’s possible that unscheduled impacts might occur because of weather or other factors. For the most current information about highway conditions statewide, visit ADOT’s Traveler Information site at www.az511.gov, follow ADOT on Twitter (@ArizonaDOT) or call 511, except while driving

U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine L. Chao Announces More Than $9 Million for Tribal Transportation Safety Improvements

WASHINGTON – U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine L. Chao announced today that 74 tribes in 20 states will receive more than $9 million for 77 projects from the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA)’s Tribal Transportation Program Safety Fund (TTPSF) to improve transportation safety on tribal lands.

“Transportation is a key to accessing opportunity and we are committed to helping make travel safer on tribal roads,” said Secretary Elaine L. Chao. “These funds will assist tribal communities in building a system that improves safety for the traveling public and provides residents increased access to greater long-term economic opportunity.”

The funds will be used for safety planning and roadway improvements. FHWA received 172 applications from 128 recognized tribes requesting a total of $40.3 million in assistance.

Congress created the program to improve highway safety on tribal roads and other transportation facilities – statistically, some of the most hazardous in the nation because of poor physical condition and other factors. Examples of this year’s grant recipients include:

 

  • The Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe in Minnesota will receive $950,175 to build a 4.1-mile-long bike/pedestrian trail to improve safety of area pedestrians.

  • The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes in Montana will receive $438,531 to install and upgrade guardrail at 21 locations, including at bridge approaches and embankments, which is expected to reduce roadway departure crashes at the identified locations by 25 percent.

  • The Colorado River Indian Tribes in Arizona will receive $408,500 to construct turn lanes and other intersection improvements at First Avenue to reduce fatal and serious injury crashes on a road that has experienced four fatal crashes in the past 15 years.

  • The Sac and Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa will receive $156,560 to build the West Village frontage road. When completed, it will reduce the number of vehicles at two intersections along US-30 and improve safety for tribal members, tribal operations staff and emergency service personnel driving to and from the main body of the Meskwaki Settlement to West Village.

  • The Navajo Nation in New Mexico will receive $72,000 to improve safety of BIA Route N36 by installing additional signs and rehabilitating nearly 30 miles of pavement on one of the state’s most dangerous roads. 

  • The Native Village of Kotzebue in Alaska will receive $43,861 to prevent accidents and improve safety with school zone and parking lot improvements for the Nikaitchuat Ilisagviat School, which serves young children. The new paved and striped parking lot will direct traffic smoothly and safely during pick-up and drop-off times, and provide enough parking capacity for the building which is shared with the Tribal Council.

A complete list of this year’s recipients, and additional detail about the program, can be found online at http://flh.fhwa.dot.gov/progra ms/ttp/

Kayenta Township Call to Public Meeting: Enacting the Navajo Nation Firearms Act

The Kayenta Township is announcing a call to public meeting at the Kayenta Townhall on Thursday, May 4th, 2017 at 10am.

The purpose of this meeting is to gain community input on the proposed Navajo Nation Legislation #0114-17 of amending Title 17 of the Navajo Nation Code and Enacting the Navajo Nation Firearms Act.

Everyone is strongly encouraged to attend.

You can view the proposed Navajo Nation Legislation #0114-17 here: http://kayentatownship-nsn.gov/Home/PDF/prop_firearms_leg.pdf