Indian Health Service Loan Repayment Program

The Indian Health Service (IHS) Loan Repayment Program (LRP) awards up to $20,000 per year for the repayment of your qualified student loans in exchange for an initial two-year service obligation to practice full time at an Indian health program site.

In order to qualify for this program, you must be a health professional practicing in specific health profession disciplines, you must be willing to commit to an initial two-year service obligation while working in health facilities serving American Indian and Alaska Native communities.

Opportunities are based on staffing needs and the availability of funds. Distribution of LRP awards are based on a ranking system created to address these needs. Our system identifies hiring priorities for those Indian health program facilities with the greatest staffing needs in specific health profession disciplines. American Indians and Alaska Natives receive priority consideration when all factors are equal between applicants.

For more information, please visit www.ihs.gov/loanrepayment

Interior Department to Hold Tribal Consultation on Updating Indian Trader License Regulations

WASHINGTON – Acting Assistant Secretary – Indian Affairs Michael S. Black announced today that the Department of the Interior has scheduled a series of tribal consultation sessions beginning February 23, 2017, on updating the Licensed Indian Trader regulations at 25 C.F.R. Part 140.  The Department is taking this action in an effort to modernize implementation of the Indian Trader statutes consistent with federal policies of tribal self-determination and self-governance.

“The Interior Department’s Indian Trader regulations need updating to reflect the present day realities of commerce and business development on tribal lands,” Black said.  “I strongly encourage tribal government and business leaders to give us their feedback on ways in which these regulations can be improved to better reflect their business environments and the Nation-to-Nation relationship.”

The Department is asking for public comments on whether and how it should update the regulations, including how they might be updated to govern who trades on Indian lands and how they can better promote tribal self-determination regarding trade on Indian lands.  The regulations were first published in 1957, revised in 1965, and modified in 1984.

On December 9, 2016, the Department published in the Federal Register an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM) stating that it is considering whether to propose an administrative rule that would comprehensively update the Indian Trader regulations.  The Department is seeking comments on questions that were listed in the December 9 notice.

On February 8, 2017, the Department published in the Federal Register a notice with complete information on the dates, times and locations for the eight tribal consultation sessions to be held.

The Department is seeking comments from tribes, states and their agencies, and the public.  Comments must be submitted on or before April 10, 2017.

For more details on the ANPRM and how to submit comments, see the December 9 Federal Register notice here.  For the complete schedule of tribal consultation sessions, visit the Indian Affairs Office of Regulatory Affairs& Collaborative Action webpage here

Human Remains Found: Public Assistance Requested

Thursday morning, February 9, 2017, human remains were found in an open field half a mile east of the Inscription House Clinic in Inscription House, AZ.

Female clothing found at the location:

  • Black tank top with the words “California Diamond”
  • Black t-shirt with pink pin stripes
  • Dark blue skinny pants/jeans with clear rhinestone inlays on both rear pockets
  • Grey/Green stripe cotton shirt dress
  • Tan colored house boots

Should anyone have any information or questions on whom this person may be, please contact the Kayenta Police Department (928) 697-5600 and/or the Kayenta Criminal Investigation Office (928) 697-5511

 

Smithsonian Traveling Exhibition “Roots of Wisdom” Presents Native Knowledge and Modern Science Working Together

“Roots of Wisdom: Native Knowledge. Shared Science” begins its national tour Feb. 13 at Hale La‘akea Windward Community College’s Library Learning Commons in K?ne‘ohe, Hawaii, where it will be on view through May 7. The Smithsonian traveling exhibition explores the ways in which traditional knowledge of indigenous communities and cutting-edge Western science are being applied. The national tour will continue to the Farragut Museum in Farragut, Tenn., June 3 to Aug. 27.

“Roots of Wisdom” explores four inspiring stories of environmental and cultural restoration from the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Tulalip Tribes, Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and Native Hawaiians. The exhibition tells the stories of these communities, giving visitors examples of how traditional knowledge and Western science provide complementary solutions to ecological and health challenges. The stories featured in “Roots of Wisdom” reflect the sacred relationship that each community has with its homeland and pass along knowledge of the environment, history, social values and spiritual beliefs.

Today, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (Cayuse, Umatilla and Walla Walla) are using their resources to restore waterways and native species in Eastern Oregon and the Columbia River Basin. The Tulalip Tribes of Northwest Washington are rediscovering native foods, raising organic foods and, in the process, reconnecting to native food and traditional medicine plants. In doing so, they combine traditional knowledge and Western science for a more culturally appropriate approach to health care. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is working with scientists and regional groups to restore river cane in its homelands of Western North Carolina. They are also revitalizing cultural traditions that use the cane, such as basket making. And, Native Hawaiians are using traditional knowledge and Western science to restore parts of the land divisions or small communities called ahupua’a (“ah-hoo-poo-ah-ah”), which spanned from mountaintop to the ocean. Although fish-pond restoration is challenging, the work is significant for Hawaiian culture and potentially important for future sustainable food sources.

“Roots of Wisdom: Native Knowledge. Shared Science” was developed, produced and circulated by the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES) and the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian. The exhibition was made possible with funds provided by the National Science Foundation.

SITES has been sharing the wealth of Smithsonian collections and research programs with millions of people outside Washington, D.C., for 65 years. SITES connects Americans to their shared cultural heritage through a wide range of exhibitions about art, science and history, which are shown wherever people live, work and play. Exhibition descriptions and tour schedules are available at sites.si.edu.

The Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian is committed to advancing knowledge and understanding of the Native cultures of the Western Hemisphere—past, present and future—through partnership with Native people and others.

Founded in 1944, the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) is one of the nation’s leading science museums, a world-class tourist attraction and an award-winning educational resource for the kid in everyone. OMSI operates the largest museum-based outdoor science education program in the country and provides traveling and community outreach programs that bring science-learning opportunities to schools and community organizations in nearly every county in Oregon. For general information, call 503-797-4000 or visit omsi.edu.

National Museum of the American Indian Announces Open Application for 2017 Teacher-in-Residence Program

February 7, 2017

Washington, D.C.—The Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian will host a teacher-in-residence at the museum this summer. Applications are open for instructors currently teaching grades five through 12 and will be accepted through Friday, March 31.

This program serves a vital role in Native Knowledge 360, the museum’s national education initiative to inspire and promote improvement in teaching and learning about American Indians. The museum’s resident teacher will work alongside museum staff and participating American Indian communities to provide educators and students with new perspectives about American Indian history, culture and contemporary lives.

The museum is offering one paid residency for six to eight weeks between June and August.  The resident will apply expertise in pedagogy, best classroom practices, the C3 Framework and Common Core Standards to inform online lessons under development by the museum. Tasks will also include assisting in formative testing of materials and planning effective teacher-training programs. The resident teacher will have the opportunity to create a unique project, activity or lesson for classroom use.

Call for Applications: The National Museum of the American Indian is seeking applications from highly qualified and accomplished teachers currently teaching grades five through 12. Applications will be accepted through Friday, March 31. For more information, visit the museum’s website at http://nmai.si.edu/explore/education/teacher-in-residence.

About the National Museum of the American Indian

The National Museum of the American Indian is committed to advancing knowledge and understanding of the Native cultures of the Western Hemisphere—past, present and future—through partnership with Native people and others. In Washington, the museum is located on the National Mall at Fourth Street and Independence Avenue S.W., accessible from L’Enfant Plaza Metrorail station via the Maryland Avenue/Smithsonian Museums exit. To learn more about the museum’s mission, visit AmericanIndian.si.edu. Follow the museum on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.