LOCAL KAYENTA SCHOOL HONORED BY THE ALLIANCE FOR A HEALTHIER GENERATION FOR FIGHTING CHILDHOOD OBESITY

Monument Valley High School Received Award for Leading Comprehensive Health, Physical Activity, and Wellness Efforts

(WASHINGTON, DC) September 15, 2014 – The Alliance for a Healthier Generation, founded by the American Heart Association and the Clinton Foundation, recognized Monument Valley High School with a 2014 National Healthy Schools Award for transforming its environment into a healthier place. Monument Valley High School received this award at the Alliance’s 2014 Leaders Summit in Washington, DC on September 13.

To earn the National Healthy Schools Award Monument Valley High School improved its nutrition and wellness services and physical activity programs to meet or exceed stringent standards set by the Alliance for a Healthier Generation’s Healthy Schools Program.

The Healthy Schools Program provides schools guidance, professional development, access to national experts, and evidence-based resources and tools to help them create and sustain healthy school environments. Schools are eligible for Bronze, Silver, or Gold National Healthy Schools Awards based on their level of achievement.  The Alliance’s Healthy Schools Program has helped more than 24,000 schools increase quality physical activity, health education, and healthy eating; and this year, 250 schools are being recognized with a National Healthy Schools Award.

As a recipient of the bronze National Healthy Schools Award, Monument Valley High School has implemented its motto: Eat to learn, learn to eat. This means that everyone is involved in helping students and staff make healthier choices to fuel healthy bodies that are ready to learn. In the lunch line, food service staff guide students in selecting healthy options. The Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) club is working on healthier options for students to sell at school fundraisers. And students and staff can select fresh vegetables and herbs from the community garden to continue the school’s efforts at home. The Alliance’s Healthy Schools Program has offered support to implement these changes. “Carol Chong, the Alliance’s national nutrition advisor, came all the way to Kayenta to give our nutrition staff training,” said Debra Johns. “The resources on the website were very helpful in guiding us in choices of healthy snacks for our students.”

“We applaud the achievements of our 2014 honorees,” said Dr. Howell Wechsler, Chief Executive Officer, Alliance for a Healthier Generation. “They are exemplary in their efforts to get students and staff eating better and moving more, and they prove that it is possible to build healthy school environments. We need thousands more schools across the country like Monument Valley High School—schools that are fully committed to promoting health and wellness, which is vital to improving students’ academic performance.”

To further strengthen the Healthy Schools Program, the Alliance brokers and implements voluntary agreements with industry leaders to provide schools better access to healthier foods, beverages, and physical activity. Additionally, the Alliance’s landmark agreement with the American Beverage Association has contributed to a 90 percent reduction in calories from beverages shipped to schools between the 2004-2010 school years.

The Alliance’s Healthy Schools Program is supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. To become a healthier place for students to learn and staff to work, any school in the United States can enroll and receive assistance and support, at no cost. Find out more at HealthierGeneration.org.

Governor Brewer Issues Declaration of Emergency in Response to Statewide Flooding

PHOENIX – Governor Jan Brewer today declared a State of Emergency in response to record flooding in Arizona.

On September 8, 2014, powerful rains combined with remnants of Hurricane Norbert caused record precipitation and flooding throughout Arizona. The storms resulted in significant impacts to transportation infrastructure throughout the Phoenix metropolitan area in Maricopa County, including the closure of State Route 51, Interstate 10 and 17 and U.S. Route 60. The heavy rains also threatened lives, caused residential damages, forced evacuations in La Paz County and required emergency response search and rescue missions, including the American Red Cross opening shelters in Maricopa and La Paz Counties. The threat of flooding remains high due to heavily saturated soils and the anticipation of additional waves of precipitation.

Governor Brewer is authorized under to A.R.S. § 26-303(D) to declare a State of Emergency to provide financial support for eligible response and recovery costs.  Maricopa and La Paz Counties have declared a state of emergency and are requesting the state’s financial assistance to recover from the flooding. The Governor’s Declaration:

a. Declares that a State of Emergency exists in Maricopa and La Paz Counties due to flooding, effective September 8, 2014; and

b. Acknowledges that this weather system is still passing through the State of Arizona, and will be amended to include additional counties as the situation requires; and

c. Directs that the sum of $200,000 from the general fund be made available to the Director of the Arizona Division of Emergency Management; and

d. Directs that the State of Arizona Emergency Response and Recovery Plan be used to direct and control state and other assets and authorize the Director of the Arizona Division of Emergency Management to coordinate state assets; and

e. Authorizes the Adjutant General to mobilize and call to activate all or such part of the Arizona National Guard as is determined necessary to assist in the protection of life and property throughout the State.        

Preliminary damage assessments will be scheduled by the Arizona Department of Emergency Management’s Recovery Office in conjunction with the counties, as requested. Response costs and damage to public infrastructure have not yet been estimated by the counties.

Visit the Arizona Emergency Information Network website – www.AzEIN.gov – for emergency updates, preparedness and hazard information, and multimedia resources.

Land Buy-Back Program Tops $100 Million in Payments to American Indian Landowners with Fractionated Interests

New Offers will be sent to Landowners with Interests on the Flathead,Umatilla, Coeur d’Alene, Lake Traverse and Crow Indian Reservations

WASHINGTON, DC – Following Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell’s recent visit with the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Reservation, Deputy Secretary of the Interior Mike Connor today announced that more than $8.3 million in purchase offers have been mailed to nearly 2,100 individual landowners with fractional interests on that reservation. This mailing will kick off several weeks of additional purchase offers to landowners who own fractional land interests on the Umatilla, Coeur d’Alene, Lake Traverse (homeland of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate) and Crow Indian Reservations.

As part of President Obama’s commitment to help restore tribal homelands, the Department’s Land Buy-Back Program for Tribal Nations (Buy-Back Program) has successfully concluded transactions worth almost $103 million, restoring the equivalent of nearly 265,000 acres of land to tribal governments.

“The success of the Buy-Back Program is reflected in our ongoing collaborations with tribal governments and active outreach to individual owners,” said Deputy Secretary Connor. “We know that tribal leaders can best explain the value of reducing fractionated lands and the significant benefit to Indian Country, and we are committed to making sure that individuals are aware of this historic opportunity to strengthen tribal sovereignty by supporting the consolidation of Indian lands.”

The Buy-Back Program implements the land consolidation component of the Cobell Settlement, which provided $1.9 billion to purchase fractional interests in trust or restricted land from willing sellers at fair market value within a 10-year period. Individuals who choose to sell their interests receive payments directly into their Individual Indian Money (IIM) accounts. Consolidated interests are immediately restored to tribal trust ownership for uses benefiting the reservation community and tribal members.


There are almost 245,000 owners of nearly three million fractional interests, spanning 150 Indian reservations, who are eligible to participate in the Buy-Back Program. Many see little or no economic benefit from what are often very small undivided interests in lands that cannot be utilized due to their highly fractionated state.

In addition to receiving fair market value for their land based on objective appraisals, sellers also receive a base payment of $75 per offer, regardless of the value of the land.

Flathead Reservation landowners will have until October 24, 2014 to return accepted offers.  

Sales of land interests will also result in up to $60 million in contributions to the Cobell Education Scholarship Fund. This contribution is in addition to the amounts paid to individual sellers, so it will not reduce the amount landowners receive for their interests.

Landowners can contact the Trust Beneficiary Call Center at (888) 678-6836 with questions about their purchase offers. Individuals can also visit their local Office of the Special Trustee for American Indians (OST), or Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) office or find more information at www.doi.gov/buybackprogram/landowners in order to make informed decisions about their land.

Individual participation is voluntary. A decision to sell land for restoration to tribes does not impact a landowner’s eligibility to receive individual settlement payments from the Cobell Settlement, which are being handled by the Garden City Group. Inquiries regarding Settlement payments should be directed to (800) 961-6109.

Interior Offers Nearly $100 Million to More Than 4,000 Landowners with Interests at Gila River and Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservations to Reduce Fractionation of Tribal Lands

Offers Will Be Valid for 45 Days as Part of $1.9 Billion Land Buy-Back Program

WASHINGTON – The Department of the Interior today announced that purchase offers have been sent to more than 4,000 individual landowners with fractional interests at the Gila River Indian Reservation in Arizona and the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation in Montana. These offers, totaling nearly $100 million, will give eligible landowners with interests in tribal priority tracts the opportunity to voluntarily sell their land to be held in trust for each tribe.

With these offers, Interior’s Land Buy-Back Program for Tribal Nations (Buy-Back Program) has sent more than 37,000 purchase offers to owners of fractionated interests. The Program has successfully concluded transactions worth nearly $97 million and has restored the equivalent of almost 265,000 acres of land to tribal governments.

“I continue to be encouraged by the progress we see with the Buy-Back Program, and welcome the ongoing collaboration we have had with many Tribal Nations as we implement this Program across Indian Country,” said Deputy Secretary Michael Connor. “The success of the Buy-Back Program is vitally important. We are working vigorously with tribal staff to make sure that individuals are aware of this historic opportunity to strengthen tribal sovereignty by supporting the consolidation of Indian lands.”

The Buy-Back Program implements the land consolidation component of the Cobell Settlement, which provided $1.9 billion to purchase fractional interests in trust or restricted land from willing sellers at fair market value within a 10-year period. Individuals who choose to sell their interests will receive payments directly into their IIM accounts. Consolidated interests are immediately restored to tribal trust ownership for uses benefiting the reservation community and tribal members. 

There are almost 245,000 owners of nearly 3 million fractional interests, spanning 150 Indian reservations, who are eligible to participate in the Program. Many see little or no economic benefit from what are often very small undivided interests in lands that cannot be utilized due to their highly fractionated state. 

In addition to receiving fair market value for their land based on objective appraisals, sellers also receive a base payment of $75 per offer, regardless of the value of the land.

Sales of land interests will also result in up to $60 million in contributions to the Cobell Education Scholarship Fund. This contribution by Interior is in addition to the amounts paid to individual sellers, so it will not reduce the amount landowners receive for their interests.

Gila River landowners will have until October 10, 2014, to return accepted offers. 

Northern Cheyenne landowners will have until October 17, 2014, to return accepted offers. 

Landowners can contact the Trust Beneficiary Call Center at 888-678-6836 with questions about their purchase offers. Individuals can also visit their local Office of the Special Trustee for American Indians (OST) or Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) office, or find more information at www.doi.gov/buybackprogram/landowners in order to make informed decisions about their land.

Individual participation is voluntary. A decision to sell land for restoration to tribes does not impact a landowner’s eligibility to receive individual settlement payments from the Cobell Settlement, which are being handled by the Garden City Group.

Unofficial Results for Navajo Nation Tribal Council

Chinle Total Votes
(1 of 1 polls)
Leonard H. Pete 807
Eugene Tso 419
Harry Claw 419
Low Mountain/Tachee-Blue Gap/Nazlini/
Tselani-Cottonwood/Many Farms
Total Votes
(5 of 5 polls)
Sampson Begay, Low Mountain 223
2. Kee Allen Begay Jr., Many Farms Chapter 897
3. Marlene Thomas, Many Farms Chapter 187
4. Harry Gorman Jr., Tselani/Cottonwood Chapter 397
5. Crystalyne Gayle Curley, Tselani/Cottonwood Chapter 519
6. Lee Vincent Bigwater, Nazlini Chapter 279
Forest Lake/Black Mesa/
Hardrock/Whippoorwill/Pinon
Total Votes
(5 of 5 polls)
1. Dwight Witherspoon, Hardrock Chapter 1148
2. Bill Yazzie, Pinon Chapter 340
3. Jimmy Yellowhair, Black Mesa Chapter 516
Tsé Ch’izhi/Round Rock/Rock Point
/Lukachukai/Tsaile-Wheatfields
Total Votes
(5 of 5 chapters)
1. Jaye R. Tom, Lukachukai Chapter 326
2. Nelson S. BeGaye, Tsaile/Wheatfields Chapter 669
3. Margie R. S. Begay, Tsaile/Wheatfields Chapter 390
4. Norman L. Begay, Lukachukai Chapter 480
5. Zane James, Tsaile/Wheatfields Chapter 474
Red Lake/Crystal/
Sawmill/Fort Defiance
Total Votes
(4 of 4 polls)
1. Arval T. McCabe, Red Lake Chapter 183
2. Benjamin L. Bennett, Fort Defiance Chapter 475
3. Alfred Barney, Red Lake Chapter 267
4. Genevieve J. Jackson, Fort Defiance Chapter 463
5. Tom M. White Jr., Fort Defiance Chapter 530
6. Juanita J. Martinez-Chavez, Sawmill Chapter 151
7. Virginia A. Benally, Crystal Chapter 362
Mexican Springs/Coyote Canyon/
Tohatchi/Naschitti/Bahastl’a’a’
Total Votes
(5 of 5 polls)
1. Hoskie Bryant, Naschitti Chapter 219
2. Mel R. Begay, Coyote Canyon Chapter 939
3. Thomas ‘Tom” Ranger, Coyote Canyon Chapter 145
4. Peter Watchman, Mexican Springs Chapter 196
5. Willis Nez, Naschitti Chapter 426
6. Carol W. Bitsoi, Naschitti Chapter 245
7. Harrison Plummer, Coyote Canyon Chapter 576
Manuelito/Bááháálí/Tsayatoh/
Rock Springs/Chichiltah/Tsé ?ich’’
Total Votes
(6 of 6 polls)
1. Paul Houston, Chichiltah Chapter 444
2. Chancey Martinez, Tsayatoh Chapter 86
3. Emily Ellison, Chichiltah Chapter 313
4. Arlene Nakai-Brown, Manuelito Chapter 324
5. Christopher H. Morris, Baahaali Chapter 133
6. Seth Damon, Baahaali Chapter 858
7. Walter B. Hudson, Tsayatoh Chapter 364
8. Maureen Curley, Chichiltah Chapter 183
9. William Skeet, Baahaali Chapter 129
Oak Springs/St. Michaels Total Votes
(2 of 2 polls)
1. Curran Hannon, St. Michaels Chapter 403
2. Jonathan L. Hale, Oaksprings Chapter 799
Tsé si’ Áni,/Wide Ruins/
Klagetoh/Nahata Dziil/Houck
Total Votes
(5 of 5 polls)
1. LaVerne M. Joe, Klagetoh Chapter 272
2. LaVonne Tsosie, Nahata Dziil Chapter 153
3. Raymond Smith Jr., Tsé si’ çni Chapter 340
4. Darrell Tso, Nahata Dziil Chapter 293
5. Clarence Chee, Wide Ruins Chapter 160
6. Arbin Mitchell, Wide Ruins Chapter 301
7. Lorenzo Curley, Houck Chapter 536
Jeddito/Cornfields/Ganado/
Steamboat/Kin Dah ?ichíí
Total Votes
(5 of 5 polls)
1. Alton Joe Shepherd, Ganado Chapter 2133
Indian Wells/Greasewood Springs/
Teesto/Whitecone/Dilkon
Total Votes
(5 of 5 polls)
1. Elmer P. Begay, Dilkon Chapter 553
2. Bill Spencer, Greasewood Springs Chapter 142
3. Henry Haskie, Indian Wells Chapter 179
4. Lee Jack Sr., Whitecone Chapter 603
5. Eula C. Yazzie, Whitecone Chapter 261
Tolani Lake/ Ts’dii to’ii/
Coalmine Canyon/Cameron/Leupp
Total Votes
(5 of 5 chapters)
1. Walter Phelps, Leupp Chapter 743
2. Leonard Chee, Leupp Chapter 804
3. Lorenzo Robbins, Cameron Chapter 184
To’Nanees’Dizi Local Governance Total Votes
(1 of 1)
1. Angie Williams, To’Nanees’Dizi Local Governance 239
2. Otto Tso, To’Nanees’Dizi Local Governance 489
3. James Bilagody, To’Nanees’Dizi Local Governance 274
4. Perry B. Yazzie, To’Nanees’Dizi Local Governance 69
5. Raymond Maxx, To’Nanees’Dizi Local Governance 206
Coppermine/Lechee/ K’Ai’ Bii’ Tó/
Bodaway-Gap/Tonalea
Total Votes
(5 of 5)
1. Shalinda Johnson, K’Ai’Bii’To Chapter 344
2. Chester Claw, Tonalea Chapter 149
3. Tauchoney Slim Jr., Tonalea Chapter 565
4. Darrell R. Marks, Tonalea Chapter 242
5. Darlene Martin, Bodaway/Gap Chapter 92
6. Regina Allison, Bodaway/Gap Chapter 467
7. Billy Arizona Jr., Bodaway/Gap Chapter 263
8. Marie B. Acothley, Tonalea Chapter 157
Navajo Mountain/Tsah Bii Kin/
Shonto/Oljato
Total Votes
(4 of 4 chapters)
1. Jonathan Nez, Shonto Community Governance 1524
Chilchinbeto/Dennehotso/Kayenta Total Votes
(3 of 3)
1. Walter Begay Jr., Kayenta Chapter 466
2. Stanley Clitso, Kayenta Chapter 410
3. Teddy Begay, Kayenta Chapter 104
4. Sylvia Laughter, Dennehotso Chapter 210
5. Nathaniel Brown, Dennehotso Chapter 417
6. Harrison Tsosie, Dennehotso Chapter 211
Mexican Water/Tó likan/
Teecnospos/Red Mesa/Aneth
Total Votes
(5 of 5 polls)
1. Davis Filfred, Aneth Chapter 869
2. Francis Redhouse, Teecnospos Chapter 316
3. David L. John, Mexican Water Chapter 266
4. Steven S. Benally, To Likan Chapter 435
5. Herman Farley, Red Mesa Chapter 411
Toadlena/Two Grey Hills/Beclabito/Gadii’áhi/To’Koi/Cove/Sheep Springs/Red Valley/Tsé Al Náoztii Total Votes
(7 of 7 polls)
1. Amber Kanazbah Crotty, Sheepsprings Chapter 572
2. J. R. Hunt, Toadlena/Two Grey Hills Chapter 390
3. Stanley Hardy, Toadlena/Two Grey Hills Chapter 207
4. Everett Howe, Cove Chapter 468
5. Larry Duncan, Tse alnaozt’i’i Chapter 662
6. David L. Tom, Beclabito Chapter 240
7. Eloise Brown, Tse alnaozti’i Chapter 228
Shiprock Total Votes
(1 of 1 poll)
1. Jerry Jay Todacheene, Shiprock Chapter 17
2. Myron K. Begay, Shiprock Chapter 166
3. Lula Jackson, Shiprock Chapter 225
4. Ray Begaye, Shiprock Chapter 540
5. William Lee, Shiprock Chapter 187
6. Wilbur M. Nelson Jr., Shiprock Chapter 42
7. Tom Chee, Shiprock Chapter 468
8. Rose Fasthorse Nofchissey, Shiprock Chapter 178
9. Wallace Charley, Shiprock Chapter 301
San Juan/T’istsoh Sikaad/
Newcomb/Tse Daa Kaan/
Nenahnezad/Upper Fruitland
Total Votes
(6 of 6)
1. LoRenzo Bates, Upper Fruitland Chapter 1505
2. George Arthur, San Juan Chapter 614
Whiterock/Lake Valley/Nahodishgish/Tse’ii’ahi’/
Becenti/Nageezi/Crownpoint/Huerfano
Total Votes
(8 of 8 polls)
1. Jonathan Perry, Becenti Chapter 573
2. Gilbert Roger, Whiterock Chapter 245
3. Julius Elwood, Tse’ii’ahi’ Chapter 221
4. Andrew C. Charley, Nageezi Chapter 176
5. Ben Woody Jr., Huerfano Chapter 370
6. Rosilyn Smith, Tse’ii’ahi’ Chapter
7. Janice Padilla, Lake Valley Chapter 305
8. Danny Simpson, Huerfano Chapter 518
Pueblo Pintado/Casamero Lake/Whitehorse Lake/Counselor/Ojo Encino/Littlewater/Baca/Prewitt/Torreon Total Votes
(8 of 8)
1. Leonard Tsosie, Whitehorse Lake Chapter 747
2. Daniel E. Tso, Torreon Chapter 547
3. Hoskie Kee, Baca/Prewitt Chapter 482
4. Fernie Yazzie, Casamero Lake Chapter 482
Smith Lake/Iyanbito/Mariano Lake/Pinedale/Thoreau/Church Rock Total Votes
(6 of 6 chapters)
1. Edmund E. Yazzie, Thoreau Chapter 1361
2. Anselm Morgan, Smith Lake Chapter 675
3. Titus Jay Nez, Church Rock Chapter 571
4. Anthony Begay, Mariano Lake 244
Tohajillee/Ramah/Alamo Total Votes
(3 of 3)
1. Norman M. Begay, Tohajiilee Chapter 396
2. Martha Garcia, Ramah Chapter 466
3. Leo L. Pino, Ramah Chapter 190
4. Buddy Mexicano, Alamo Chapter 163
5. George Apachito, Alamo Chapter 81